Our Logo

As characterised by the tree branch in our logo, we believe our role in children’s development is to be the branch that works in partnership with families (birds in nest) to support each child in their early Learning (young bird about to take flight).


Children's Learning Is optimised Through:


Partnership with families

We recognise that families are children’s first and most influential teachers and children’s overall development will be enhanced if educators work in partnership with families where we build on the strength of each other’s knowledge based on an understanding of each other’s expectations and attitudes. “When educators establish respectful and caring relationships with children and families, they are able to work together to construct curriculum and learning experiences relevant to children in their local context. These experiences gradually expand children’s knowledge and understanding of the world.”

Valuing and respecting each child’s unique individuality and diversity

To support children and families we need to recognise that each child experiences different ways of being, belonging and becoming. Each child is unique and they bring their diverse experiences, perspectives, expectations, knowledge and skills to their learning. “The diversity in family life means that children experience belonging, being and becoming in many different ways. They bring diverse experiences, perspectives, expectations, knowledge and skills to their learning”. Our role is to help children develop a sense of themselves as individuals, with their own skills, strengths, likes and dislikes and to develop a positive sense of self. Children develop a sense of belonging and a strong sense of identity “who am I? where do I belong?”.

Assessing children’s learning holistically with high expectations

It is from these roots that children begin to develop a strong base to support their emerging understandings and capabilities. Children’s learning is connected therefore a deeper understanding of children recognises that their development must be viewed holistically. “When early childhood educators take a holistic approach they pay attention to children’s physical, personal, social, emotional and spiritual wellbeing as well as cognitive aspects of learning”.

Open ended play opportunities

As children grow and develop they are influenced by their social contexts, relationships, environments and the opportunities for learning that they provide – enriching environments promote strength and growth. “Environments that allows time and space for children to lose themselves in what they are doing contribute to children’s sense of being, as they become completely in the here and now experience. Providing mostly open ended resources are more likely to encourage this”. Through play children have the opportunity to apply their own understandings and capabilities and explore their sense of wonder and discovery – children develop a sense of being.

Primary caring relationships (secure, respectful and reciprocal relationships and engaging in emotional interactions and communications with significant others)

Why is primary caring important? Primary caring supports children to develop positive, reciprocal attachments and provides them with a safe base and sense of security to explore the world around them. It creates a caring environment that supports children to grow and develop a strong sense of wellbeing. After parents, professional caregivers have one of the next largest impacts on the developing child. It is vital that carers develop a warm, respectful, and stable relationship with the child and family.

Scaffolding children’s learning in the zone of proximal development through intentional teaching and spontaneous (teachable moments)

Through primary caring educators use their holistic understanding of the child to scaffold their learning in the zone of proximal development (skills that can be mastered with guidance and encouragement from their primary carers). Through intentional teaching and spontaneous (teachable moments) educators offer guidance that promote a balance between challenge and success enabling each child to become a confident and involved learner.

Recognising and valuing children’s emerging autonomy

As children develop secure relationships and move out into the world, they become more able to do things for themselves, explore and be independent. They are encouraged to use their developing autonomy to participate in collaborative experiences and to contribute to routine activities. This encourages them to develop an understanding that they are connected with and contribute to their world.


Through interpersonal relationships and involvement children begin to understand different ways of being and develop their own values and beliefs that will shape who they become. They become effective communicators and develop an understanding of the reciprocal rights and responsibilities necessary for active community participation. We aim to ensure each and every child has the opportunity to develop dispositions for learning, understandings and ‘life skills’ that will enable them to be active participants in creating a ‘better’ future for themselves. Children’s early learning and relationships are the foundation for their future success, and it is our role to ensure their first steps are supported by quality caregiving.

 

Our philosophy is informed by the following theories and theorists:

  • Vygotsky’s socio-cultural theory of learning and zone of proximal development
  • Reggio’s Emilia’s philosophy that ‘it takes a village to raise a child’
  • Robyn Dolby and the attachment theory to create secure supportive relationships “Circle of security”
  • Magda Gerba’s Philosophy “the importance of respecting babies and following their cues”
  • Maria Montessori theory based on a method of seeing children as they really are and creating environments which foster the fulfillment of their highest potential – spiritual, emotional, physical, and intellectual – as members of a family and the world community.

 

Over time our philosophy and practice will continue to grow and develop. We as a centre continually engage in reflective practice and seek ways to engage in ongoing learning becoming co-learners with children, families and communities to examine our practices, reviewing outcomes achieved and creating new ideas. We value the continuity and richness of local knowledge shared by community members, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elders


References:


Our Logo

As characterised by the tree branch in our logo, we believe our role in children’s development is to be the branch that works in partnership with families (birds in nest) to support each child in their early Learning (young bird about to take flight).


Children's Learning Is optimised Through:


Partnership with families

We recognise that families are children’s first and most influential teachers and children’s overall development will be enhanced if educators work in partnership with families where we build on the strength of each other’s knowledge based on an understanding of each other’s expectations and attitudes. “When educators establish respectful and caring relationships with children and families, they are able to work together to construct curriculum and learning experiences relevant to children in their local context. These experiences gradually expand children’s knowledge and understanding of the world.”

Valuing and respecting each child’s unique individuality and diversity

To support children and families we need to recognise that each child experiences different ways of being, belonging and becoming. Each child is unique and they bring their diverse experiences, perspectives, expectations, knowledge and skills to their learning. “The diversity in family life means that children experience belonging, being and becoming in many different ways. They bring diverse experiences, perspectives, expectations, knowledge and skills to their learning”. Our role is to help children develop a sense of themselves as individuals, with their own skills, strengths, likes and dislikes and to develop a positive sense of self. Children develop a sense of belonging and a strong sense of identity “who am I? where do I belong?”.

Assessing children’s learning holistically with high expectations

It is from these roots that children begin to develop a strong base to support their emerging understandings and capabilities. Children’s learning is connected therefore a deeper understanding of children recognises that their development must be viewed holistically. “When early childhood educators take a holistic approach they pay attention to children’s physical, personal, social, emotional and spiritual wellbeing as well as cognitive aspects of learning”.

Open ended play opportunities

As children grow and develop they are influenced by their social contexts, relationships, environments and the opportunities for learning that they provide – enriching environments promote strength and growth. “Environments that allows time and space for children to lose themselves in what they are doing contribute to children’s sense of being, as they become completely in the here and now experience. Providing mostly open ended resources are more likely to encourage this”. Through play children have the opportunity to apply their own understandings and capabilities and explore their sense of wonder and discovery – children develop a sense of being.

Primary caring relationships (secure, respectful and reciprocal relationships and engaging in emotional interactions and communications with significant others)

Why is primary caring important? Primary caring supports children to develop positive, reciprocal attachments and provides them with a safe base and sense of security to explore the world around them. It creates a caring environment that supports children to grow and develop a strong sense of wellbeing. After parents, professional caregivers have one of the next largest impacts on the developing child. It is vital that carers develop a warm, respectful, and stable relationship with the child and family.

Scaffolding children’s learning in the zone of proximal development through intentional teaching and spontaneous (teachable moments)

Through primary caring educators use their holistic understanding of the child to scaffold their learning in the zone of proximal development (skills that can be mastered with guidance and encouragement from their primary carers). Through intentional teaching and spontaneous (teachable moments) educators offer guidance that promote a balance between challenge and success enabling each child to become a confident and involved learner.

Recognising and valuing children’s emerging autonomy

As children develop secure relationships and move out into the world, they become more able to do things for themselves, explore and be independent. They are encouraged to use their developing autonomy to participate in collaborative experiences and to contribute to routine activities. This encourages them to develop an understanding that they are connected with and contribute to their world.


Through interpersonal relationships and involvement children begin to understand different ways of being and develop their own values and beliefs that will shape who they become. They become effective communicators and develop an understanding of the reciprocal rights and responsibilities necessary for active community participation. We aim to ensure each and every child has the opportunity to develop dispositions for learning, understandings and ‘life skills’ that will enable them to be active participants in creating a ‘better’ future for themselves. Children’s early learning and relationships are the foundation for their future success, and it is our role to ensure their first steps are supported by quality caregiving.

 

Our philosophy is informed by the following theories and theorists:

  • Vygotsky’s socio-cultural theory of learning and zone of proximal development
  • Reggio’s Emilia’s philosophy that ‘it takes a village to raise a child’
  • Robyn Dolby and the attachment theory to create secure supportive relationships “Circle of security”
  • Magda Gerba’s Philosophy “the importance of respecting babies and following their cues”
  • Maria Montessori theory based on a method of seeing children as they really are and creating environments which foster the fulfillment of their highest potential – spiritual, emotional, physical, and intellectual – as members of a family and the world community.

 

Over time our philosophy and practice will continue to grow and develop. We as a centre continually engage in reflective practice and seek ways to engage in ongoing learning becoming co-learners with children, families and communities to examine our practices, reviewing outcomes achieved and creating new ideas. We value the continuity and richness of local knowledge shared by community members, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elders


References: